fbpx

On the internet, nobody knows you’re a troll. The DSA: Five recommendations

Remember Peter Stainer’s iconic cartoon with a caption “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog”(1)? 28 years later more suitable version would read “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a troll.“ Big online platforms have handed the mic to billions of people. What began with the promise of endless freedom for those who did not have a voice before, quickly  turned into a stage for hate and agitation. Overwhelmed by the hate we encounter online, many of us feel unprotected and thus unsafe expressing ourselves. 
We offer a closer look at the silencing effect, it’s links to the far-right hate campaigns, the existing dilemma between freedom of expression and limiting hate speech, and what Digital Services Act can deliver.        

Attack on democracy in disguise 

Speech restricting laws and repressions in Southeast Asia have provenly contributed to self-censorship among individuals in the region concerning their political expression. (2) However, self-censorship is not only used to protect oneself from government crackdowns. With private parties, like far-right wing groupings, strategically attacking marginalised groups online to silence them, self-censorship is becoming a tool applied by those affected and bystanders alike. For decades, the self-regulatory approach that fills a legislative gap, has allowed for private companies to make content-decisions, orchestrate what we see on our social media walls and even influence who do we vote for in the elections that are coming up next. All of that wrapped in a multi-billion business model. Now the EU is a frontrunner in a marathon, finally attempting to lay out some ground rules for online platforms through the Digital Services Act and Digital Markets Act.  

Legislators’ and society’s concerns about the Big Tech making content decisions mainly centre around protection of freedom of speech and data privacy. We are convinced that freedom of speech has yet another enemy that is actively using online platforms to undermine democratic values.  

Addressing online violence and attack on our democracies that are in the disguise of protecting the freedom of speech is, perhaps, one of the hardest challenges of this Regulation.

Silencing as an organised act by the far-right 

Organised storms of digital violence – hateful comments and posts, personal insults, defamation and threats to family members – these are just some of the techniques that organised far-right groups like Reconquista Germanica, the alt-right and the Identitarian Movement use to draw people, especially minorities, out of online debate. (3) And while the far-right is clearly a minority, they amplify hateful voices with bots and re-posts, so it echoes wide and far. A study by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue in Germany found that only 5% of users are responsible for 50% of all the likes given to hateful comments on Facebook. (4) The French have even invented a term to describe organised hateful attacks online – calling it a digital raid (French: raid numerique).  

Social media accounts affiliated with the extreme right in France – in particular with the identarian movement – are central to the generation and spreading of anti-Arab and/or North African, anti-Muslim and anti-migrant content online. (5) Revealing organisation behind a broader anti-minority discourse targeted at non-white and non-Christian populations. Against woman, silencing techniques are often sexualised, including rape threats and image-based abuse. We would need another article to talk about that issue.  

The cost of the dilemma   

The avalanche of online hate in addition to algorithmic content curation that often highlights content that is emotional and already polarising, misleading, extremist or otherwise problematic, (6) does not leave a room for pluralistic debate. Especially, when people are drawn out – 54 % of the internet users in Germany do no longer dare to express their political opinion online and 47 % rarely participate in online discussions at all out of fear of becoming victims themselves. (7) The bystanders become part of the silenced.  This effect is alarming and should cause an outcry as it shifts our public debate in favour of those who scream the loudest and finally threatens freedom of speech, because the internet is no longer is a safe space for everyone. 

Further, the line between digital and analogue violence can disappear fast. “Twitter abuse made me buy a home security system,” writer and activist Jacklyn Friedman shared with Amnesty International in their campaign #ToxicTwitter back in 2018. (8) And this is not an individual case. 

With big part of the population being silenced by online violence in Germany, and part fearing that deletion of the content based on decisions of private companies will limit the free speech, the dilemma sounds rather like a conundrum.  

The Digital Services Act proposal put forward by the European Commission proposing uniform rules for digital services across the EU will have to answer, not ignore the problem or choose one solution over the other. Before policymakers reach the finishing line, the dilemma of freedom of speech and limiting hate speech deserves a proper attention and discussion. 

What do Human Right Courts have to say about this?  

There are several cases touching upon Hate Speech and Freedom of Speech that have been ruled by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). (9) What differs them from the issue of Silencing, however, is what legal interests are thrown onto „the scale of human rights“.  

2015, Delfi AS v. Estonia. The ECHR ruled on an Internet news portal that was held liable for comments posted by its readers, infringing the personality rights of others. The court had to decide whether this poses a violation of Article 10 of the Convention, which protects the freedom of expression – and ruled against it. (10) The personality rights of those attacked by the comments outweighed the aspect of freedom of expression of the internet portal and consequently demanded to take down the hate speech.  

However, from a legal perspective, Silencing opens yet another dimension. Instead of putting “personality rights” and “freedom of expression” face to face, Silencing treats the appreciation of “Freedom of expression” versus “freedom of expression”. This is an area of tension that is quite unexplored yet. 

To tackle the problem of limiting hate speech, we first need to understand what concrete elements make it so hard to solve. In our context, most of the systematic silencing comes from private parties. This means it is more indirect and way harder to grasp from a human rights perspective than state censorship or even private censorship originating from private companies.  

Despite those differences, the outcome remains the same: Individuals are reluctant, even afraid of expressing their opinion, coming from a fear of repression – subjectively in many cases this does not differ from any other form of censorship.  

What can legislators do now on a regulation level? 

  1. A clear codification on Union-level that illegal content will be deleted and acted upon, is the first step towards ending “legal vacuum”.
    It is paramount to let users know, that whenever they are confronted with illegal content online and want to act against it, there is a system waiting to support them in an effective, reliable and transparent way. The internet is often perceived as a legal vacuum that systematic silencing takes advantage of. 
  2. Clearly visible, low-threshold reporting channels that are close to the content in question. 
    No extra personal data should be required to notify platforms of illegal content.
  3. Online platforms should have seven days deadline for assessment of reported content. 
    Because waiting for weeks and weeks long processing can be one’s interpretation of a timely assessment, as proposed in the text. Even one hour on the internet is a long time. 
  4. Transparency should be ensured through a mandatory statement of reason for all content decisions from online platforms.
    You have a right to know why your content was deleted in the same way as you have a right to know why a defamatory post about you is still up.  
  5. Access to justice through contact point establishment in each Member State and summary proceedings in civil cases
    When turning to a court, one should not have to send a letter in a foreign language to an office in Ireland. A legal representative should be available in each of the Member States. Furthermore, establishing summary proceedings in all civil cases concerning online violence, it would allow for a timely reaction.  

These are only some of the HateAid’s recommendations on Digital Services Act, specifically linked to online content moderation and access to justice. Read more in our DSA Position here.  

List of references: 

  1. Peter Steiner, The New Yorker, July 5, 1993. 
  2. Ong, E. (2021). Online Repression and Self-Censorship: Evidence from Southeast Asia. Government and Opposition, 56(1), 141-162. doi:10.1017/gov.2019.18 
  3. R.Ahmed, D.Pisoui, 2019. The Far Right Online: An Overview of Recent Studies. Voxpol. Viewed on 5/05/21
  4. P. kreißel, J.Ebner, A.Urban, J. Guhl, 2018. Hass Auf Knopfdruck. Rechtsextreme Trollfabriken und das Ökosystem koordinierter Hasskampagnen im Netz. Institute for Strategic Dialogue, UK. 
  5. C. Guerin, Z. Fourel, C. Gatewood, 2021. La pandémie de COVID-19 : terreau fertile pour la haine en ligne. Institute for Strategic Dialogue, UK. 
  6. Lewandowsky, S., Smillie, L., Garcia, D., Hertwig, R., Weatherall, J., Egidy, S., Robertson, R.E., O’connor, C., Kozyreva, A., Lorenz-Spreen, P., Blaschke, Y. and Leiser, M., Technology and Democracy: Understanding the influence of online technologies on political behaviour and decision-making, EUR 30422 EN, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2020, ISBN 978-92-76-24088-4, doi:10.2760/709177, JRC122023. 
  7. D. Geschke, A.Klaßen, M.Quent, C. Richter, 2019. #Hass im Netz: Der schleichende Angriff auf unsere Demokratie. Eine bundesweite repräsentative Untersuchung. Institut für Demokratie und Zivilgesellschaft, Germany. ISBN: 978-3-940878-41-0 
  8. How experiencing abuse made you change the way you use the platform? Youtube. Uploaded by Amnesty International, 21/03/18.  
  9. Press Unit, 2020. Factsheet: Hate Speech. European Court of Human Rights, 2020. 
  10. ECHR. Case DELFI AS v Estonia, Application no. 64569/09 Judgement of 16 June 2015. Strasbourg, 2015.


Im Internet weiß niemand, dass du ein Troll bist. Der DSA: Fünf Empfehlungen

Erinnern Sie sich an Peter Stainers kultigen Cartoon mit der Bildunterschrift „Im Internet weiß niemand, dass Sie ein Hund sind“(1)? 28 Jahre später würde die passendere Version lauten: „Im Internet weiß niemand, dass du ein Troll bist.“ Große Online-Plattformen haben Milliarden von Menschen das Mikrofon in die Hand gegeben. Was mit dem Versprechen endloser Freiheit für diejenigen begann, die vorher keine Stimme hatten, wurde schnell zu einer Bühne für Hass und Hetze. Überwältigt von dem Hass, der uns online begegnet, fühlen sich viele von uns ungeschützt und damit unsicher, sich auszudrücken.

Wir werfen einen genaueren Blick auf den Silencing-Effekt, seine Verbindungen zu den rechtsextremen Hasskampagnen, das bestehende Dilemma zwischen Meinungsfreiheit und der Einschränkung von Hassrede und was der Digital Services Act leisten kann.

Angriff auf die Demokratie im Verborgenen

Meinungseinschränkende Gesetze und Repressionen in Südostasien haben nachweislich zur Selbstzensur der Menschen in der Region bezüglich ihrer politischen Äußerungen beigetragen. (2) Die Selbstzensur dient jedoch nicht nur dazu, sich vor staatlichen Eingriffen zu schützen. Da private Parteien, wie rechtsextreme Gruppierungen, strategisch marginalisierte Gruppen online angreifen, um sie zum Schweigen zu bringen, wird die Selbstzensur zu einem Werkzeug, das sowohl die Betroffenen als die Mitlesenden nutzen.

Jahrzehntelang hat der Ansatz der Selbstregulierung, der eine Gesetzeslücke nutzt, privaten Unternehmen erlaubt, Entscheidungen über Inhalte zu treffen – zu orchestrieren, was wir in unseren Social-Media-Feeds sehen und sogar zu beeinflussen, wen wir bei den nächsten Wahlen wählen. All das verpackt in ein milliardenschweres Geschäftsmodell. Jetzt versucht die EU endlich in einer Vorreiterrolle, mit dem Digital Services Act und dem Digital Markets Act einige Grundregeln für Online-Plattformen festzulegen.

Die Bedenken des Gesetzgebers und der Gesellschaft gegenüber den Big Tech Unternehmen, die über Inhalte entscheiden, drehen sich hauptsächlich um den Schutz der Meinungsfreiheit und des Datenschutzes. Wir sind überzeugt, dass die Meinungsfreiheit einen weiteren Feind hat, der aktiv Online-Plattformen nutzt, um demokratische Werte zu untergraben.

Eine der vielleicht größten Herausforderungen des Digital Services Act ist der Umgang mit Online-Gewalt und Angriffen auf unsere Demokratie, die unter dem Deckmantel des Schutzes der Meinungsfreiheit erfolgen.

Silencing als organisierter Akt der extremen Rechten

Organisierte Stürme digitaler Gewalt – hasserfüllte Kommentare und Posts, persönliche Beleidigungen, Verleumdungen und Drohungen gegen Familienmitglieder – das sind nur einige der Techniken, die organisierte rechtsextreme Gruppen wie Reconquista Germanica, die Alt-Right und die Identitäre Bewegung einsetzen, um Menschen, insbesondere Minderheiten, aus Online-Debatten herauszudrängen. (3) Und obwohl die Rechtsextremen eindeutig eine Minderheit sind, verstärken sie hasserfüllte Stimmen mit Bots und Re-Posts, so dass sie weit und breit ein Echo finden. Eine Studie des Instituts für Strategischen Dialog in Deutschland fand heraus, dass nur 5 % der Nutzer für 50 % aller Likes für hasserfüllte Kommentare auf Facebook verantwortlich sind. (4) Die Französ*innen haben sogar einen Begriff erfunden, um organisierte hasserfüllte Angriffe im Internet zu beschreiben – sie nennen es einen digitalen Überfall (französisch: raid numerique).

Social-Media-Accounts, die mit der extremen Rechten in Frankreich verbunden sind – insbesondere mit der identitären Bewegung – spielen eine zentrale Rolle bei der Erzeugung und Verbreitung von antiarabischen und/oder antinordafrikanischen, antimuslimischen und migrantenfeindlichen Inhalten im Internet. (5) Gegen Frauen gerichtete Unterdrückungstechniken sind oft sexualisiert, einschließlich Vergewaltigungsdrohungen und bildbasiertem Missbrauch.

Die Kosten des Dilemmas

Die Lawine des Online-Hasses zusätzlich zur algorithmischen Kuratierung von Inhalten, die oft solche hervorhebt, die emotional und bereits polarisierend, irreführend, extremistisch oder anderweitig problematisch sind (6), lässt keinen Raum für eine pluralistische Debatte. Vor allem dann nicht, wenn die Menschen eingeschüchtert werden: 54 % der Internetnutzer*innen in Deutschland trauen sich nicht mehr, ihre politische Meinung online zu äußern, und 47 % beteiligen sich aus Angst, selbst zu Betroffenen zu werden, überhaupt nicht mehr an Online-Diskussionen. (7) Die Umstehenden werden Teil der zum Schweigen Gebrachten. Dieser Effekt ist alarmierend und sollte einen Aufschrei hervorrufen, denn er verschiebt unsere öffentliche Debatte zugunsten derjenigen, die am lautesten schreien. Letztendlich bedroht er die Meinungsfreiheit, da das Internet nicht mehr ein sicherer Raum für alle ist.

Hinzu kommt, dass die Grenze zwischen digitaler und analoger Gewalt schnell verschwinden kann: „Twitter-Missbrauch hat mich dazu gebracht, ein Haussicherheitssystem zu kaufen“, teilte die Autorin und Aktivistin Jacklyn Friedman 2018 mit Amnesty International in deren Kampagne #ToxicTwitter. (8) Und das ist kein Einzelfall.

Angesichts der Tatsache, dass ein großer Teil der Bevölkerung in Deutschland durch digitale Gewalt zum Schweigen gebracht wird und ein anderer Teil befürchtet, dass die Löschung von Inhalten aufgrund von Entscheidungen privater Unternehmen die freie Meinungsäußerung einschränkt, klingt das Dilemma eher nach einer Zwickmühle.

Der von der Europäischen Kommission vorgelegte Vorschlag für den Digital Services Act, der einheitliche Regeln für digitale Dienste in der gesamten EU vorschlägt, muss eine Antwort finden, statt das Problem zu ignorieren – oder eine Lösung über die andere zu stellen. Bevor die politischen Entscheidungsträger die Ziellinie erreichen, verdient das Dilemma der Redefreiheit und der Begrenzung von Hassreden eine angemessene Aufmerksamkeit und Diskussion.

Was haben die Menschenrechtsgerichte dazu zu sagen?

Es gibt mehrere Fälle, die sich mit Hate Speech und Meinungsfreiheit befassen und die vom Europäischen Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte (EGMR) entschieden worden sind. (9) Sie unterscheiden sich jedoch von der Frage des Silencing dadurch, welche Rechtsgüter auf die „Waage der Menschenrechte“ geworfen werden.

2015, Delfi AS v. Estland. Der EGMR urteilte über ein Internet-Nachrichtenportal, das für Kommentare seiner Leser*innen haftbar gemacht wurde, die die Persönlichkeitsrechte anderer verletzten. Das Gericht hatte zu entscheiden, ob dies eine Verletzung von Artikel 10 der Konvention darstellt, der die Freiheit der Meinungsäußerung schützt – und entschied dagegen. (10) Die Persönlichkeitsrechte der durch die Kommentare Angegriffenen überwogen den Aspekt der Meinungsfreiheit des Internetportals und verlangten folglich, die Hassrede zu entfernen.

Aus juristischer Sicht eröffnet Silencing jedoch noch eine andere Dimension. Anstatt „Persönlichkeitsrechte“ und „Meinungsfreiheit“ einander gegenüberzustellen, behandelt Silencing die Abwägung von „Meinungsfreiheit“ versus „Meinungsfreiheit“. Dies ist ein Spannungsfeld, das noch recht unerforscht ist.

Um das Problem der Begrenzung von Hassreden anzugehen, müssen wir zunächst verstehen, welche konkreten Elemente es so schwer machen, es zu lösen. In unserem Kontext geht der größte Teil der systematischen Unterdrückung von Einzelpersonen aus. Das heißt, es ist indirekter und aus einer Menschenrechtsperspektive viel schwerer zu fassen als staatliche Zensur oder sogar private Zensur, die von privaten Unternehmen ausgeht.

Trotz dieser Unterschiede bleibt das Ergebnis dasselbe: Der Einzelne zögert, hat sogar Angst, seine Meinung zu äußern, aus Angst vor Repressionen – subjektiv unterscheidet sich das in vielen Fällen nicht von anderen Formen der Zensur.

Was kann der Gesetzgeber nun auf Verordnungsebene tun?

  1. Eine klare Kodifizierung auf EU-Ebene, dass illegale Inhalte gelöscht und geahndet werden, ist der erste Schritt, um das „Rechtsvakuum“ zu beenden.
    Es ist wichtig, dass Nutzer*innen wissen, wann immer sie mit illegalen Inhalten im Internet konfrontiert werden und dagegen vorgehen wollen, ein System für sie bereitsteht, das sie auf effektive, zuverlässige und transparente Weise unterstützt. Das Internet wird oft als rechtsfreier Raum wahrgenommen, den systematisches Silencing ausnutzt.
  2. Deutlich sichtbare, niedrigschwellige Meldewege, die nah an den betreffenden Inhalten sind.
    Es sollten keine zusätzlichen persönlichen Daten erforderlich sein, um Plattformen über illegale Inhalte zu informieren.
  3. Online-Plattformen sollten sieben Tage Zeit haben, gemeldete Inhalte zu prüfen.
    Im bisherigen DSA-Vorschlag steht wird nur eine „zeitnahe Bewertung“ vorgeschlagen, was auch auf wochenlanges Warten hinauslaufen könnte. Doch im Internet ist auch eine Stunde eine lange Zeit.
  4. Transparenz sollte durch eine verpflichtende Begründung für alle inhaltlichen Entscheidungen von Online-Plattformen gewährleistet werden.
    Du hast ein Recht darauf zu erfahren, warum dein Inhalt gelöscht wurde, genauso wie du ein Recht darauf hast zu erfahren, warum ein diffamierender Beitrag über dich immer noch online ist.
  5. Zugang zum Recht durch Einrichtung von Kontaktstellen in jedem Mitgliedsstaat und Schnellverfahren in Zivilsachen.
    Wenn du dich an ein Gericht wendest, solltest du nicht einen Brief in einer Fremdsprache an ein Büro in Irland schicken müssen. In jedem Mitgliedsstaat sollte ein*e Rechtsvertreter*in verfügbar sein. Darüber hinaus würde die Einführung eines Schnellverfahrens in allen zivilrechtlichen Fällen, die Online-Gewalt betreffen, eine zeitnahe Reaktion ermöglichen.

Dies sind nur einige der Empfehlungen von HateAid zum Digital Services Act, speziell im Zusammenhang mit der Moderation von Online-Inhalten und dem Zugang zur Justiz. Lies mehr auf Englisch in unserer DSA-Positionierung.

Verweise

  1. Peter Steiner, The New Yorker, July 5, 1993. 
  2. Ong, E. (2021). Online Repression and Self-Censorship: Evidence from Southeast Asia. Government and Opposition, 56(1), 141-162. doi:10.1017/gov.2019.18 
  3. R.Ahmed, D.Pisoui, 2019. The Far Right Online: An Overview of Recent Studies. Voxpol. Viewed on 5/05/21
  4. P. kreißel, J.Ebner, A.Urban, J. Guhl, 2018. Hass Auf Knopfdruck. Rechtsextreme Trollfabriken und das Ökosystem koordinierter Hasskampagnen im Netz. Institute for Strategic Dialogue, UK. 
  5. C. Guerin, Z. Fourel, C. Gatewood, 2021. La pandémie de COVID-19 : terreau fertile pour la haine en ligne. Institute for Strategic Dialogue, UK. 
  6. Lewandowsky, S., Smillie, L., Garcia, D., Hertwig, R., Weatherall, J., Egidy, S., Robertson, R.E., O’connor, C., Kozyreva, A., Lorenz-Spreen, P., Blaschke, Y. and Leiser, M., Technology and Democracy: Understanding the influence of online technologies on political behaviour and decision-making, EUR 30422 EN, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2020, ISBN 978-92-76-24088-4, doi:10.2760/709177, JRC122023. 
  7. D. Geschke, A.Klaßen, M.Quent, C. Richter, 2019. #Hass im Netz: Der schleichende Angriff auf unsere Demokratie. Eine bundesweite repräsentative Untersuchung. Institut für Demokratie und Zivilgesellschaft, Germany. ISBN: 978-3-940878-41-0 
  8. How experiencing abuse made you change the way you use the platform? Youtube. Uploaded by Amnesty International, 21/03/18.  
  9. Press Unit, 2020. Factsheet: Hate Speech. European Court of Human Rights, 2020. 
  10. ECHR. Case DELFI AS v Estonia, Application no. 64569/09 Judgement of 16 June 2015. Strasbourg, 2015.

Bleib engagiert und auf dem Laufenden mit dem HateAid Newsletter!

Du erhältst viermal jährlich alle wichtigen Neuigkeiten rund um unsere Arbeit und wie du die Online-Welt ein kleines Stückchen besser machen kannst.

Ich willige ein, dass HateAid mir regelmäßig Informationen zur Organisation und zu digitaler Gewalt per E-Mail gemäß der Datenschutzerklärung zuschickt. Ein Widerruf ist jederzeit möglich an kontakt@hateaid.org.
Wir verschicken unsere Newsletter über MailChimp. Mehr erfährst du in unseren Hinweisen zum Datenschutz.
Wir verwenden deine E-Mail-Adresse ausschließlich für den Versand unseres Newsletters.

Hoch